Thursday, 13 June 2013

A Sargent Attribution







I have just been prompted to attribute this painting of mine (from an old blog post here) entitled "Flamenco" to John Singer Sargent.  This I gladly do and apologise for not entitling it  "After Sargent" in the first place. 


I have been back to the original painting which is in the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston  



and in the course of googling it I came across the impressive and invaluable John Singer Sargent Virtual Gallery  for which I am most grateful for Sargent's studies for the painting:















19 comments:

  1. It is fantastic! I love the capture of a dance movement.

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  2. Love your "after"!. I remember the first time I saw the original and was astonished at its size and presence -one of my favorite pieces afterwards! A restaurant here in DC used to have a huge mural of it blown up on their wall -I was so sorry when they redecorated and they got rid of it!

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  3. Hi Stefan, thank you so much for this. I can always rely on you to visit my poor blog which is permanently in intensive care, ready to flat line.

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  4. Don't let it flatline - your blog is too interesting for that. Intensive care is good and a full recovery is expected, my lady. Welcome back! How about taking your coat off and staying for a while?

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  5. Thank you too, Blue, for your support. I know, I know, I must work harder at all this so the encouragement helps. x

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  6. Fascinating, as always. And isn't it always a serendipitous treat to come upon something like those Sargent studies "after the fact",
    as it were? In any case, I love your painting.

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  7. Dare I say it - I think you've got her left hand and right arm rather better than JSS!

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  8. Excellent subject. And love Sargent. And love you, too! xoxo

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  9. Thank you Mr Worthington. Yes, after having my knuckles rapped it was good to take another longer look at El Jaleo.

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  10. TDC, good to see you! Forgive me not answering straight away but some of the comments went, unusually, into junk.
    How could YOU ever be junk??

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  11. Columnist ! I could hardly agree with you and yet, and yet, it is an attractive proposition thank you.

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  12. Pigtown Design, Meg - that's sweet, thank you. x

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  13. Roseeee, I miss U, : ) love Sophia and you, I started to write in english-moroccan because of you, hahaha, Viva Galápagos!!! Kisses babe

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  14. Love the sense of motion, the dance of colors. The first time I saw this at the ESG museum, I was astonished by the size. Then, if I'm recalling correctly, it was in a grotto like room and had up lights on the floor like an old stage. I admit, however, it's quite possible that time has made a mashup of that! I have lately grown smitten with Sargent's watercolors of North Africa which your blues so remind me of.

    Glad you have surfaced. Always lovely to see you when you do.

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  15. Foquinha! Lovely to hear from you, keep being as crazy as ever. xx



    Home, that's a nice reward for finally producing a post, hearing from you. Thank you. I am always a sucker for Sargent so I shall look at his North African watercolours now.

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  16. OLE! It's fantastic, the Sargent and the West, (has a lovely ring to it!) pgt

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  17. Hey Gaye! great to see you. Cheered me up.. I am trying to recover from a form of pneumonia that has poleaxed
    me for days..

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  18. I've had people ask me why I copy other artists' works. I usually tell them it's because the artists I'm copying would copy or interpret other's works to help refine their technique. It's also a fun exercise to try and get inside their head.

    I don't understand why anyone would be rapping your knuckles for this. There's too much occultism that's grown up around art; a silly veneration of all the wrong stuff.

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  19. Hi rurritable, I've seen your work and it works!

    I often go to the National Gallery on Friday evenings with a drawing tutor from our excellent Prince's Drawing School (That's the Prince of Wales, the current one..) In the old days I'd have rushed it
    but now I will sit down in front of a Poussin or Renaissance portrait for over two hours. For me it's important to get down the whole structure, fit in all those intersecting limbs etc, rather than just
    do a detail.

    How are your animals? Time I visited, sorry. I am just recovering from pneumonia but that won't work as a long term excuse.

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